Encouraging Innovation in Denver

We believe that Denver must innovate and lead the way in order for Colorado to achieve its goal of becoming the #1 bicycle-friendly state. Here you will find programs, resources and partnerships related to our work in the Denver metro area. Your support and voice are critical to making Denver a great place to live, work and ride.

GET INVOLVED, TODAY

Denver’s 2017 General Obligation (GO) Bond delivers for biking and walking!

SAY THANKS FOR BETTER BIKING AND WALKING

It is critical that the Denver city council and mayor hear from their constituents on this issue. We will automatically connect residents to Mayor Hancock and their city council member, and provide sample messages. Our efforts to increase city funding for bicycling and walking infrastructure will not succeed without the voices of residents.

Say thanks!

On November 7, Denver voters overwhelming approved Measure 2A to fund transportation projects, ensuring the construction of 33 new miles of sidewalks and nearly 50 miles of protected bike lanes and neighborhood bikeways!

More than $70 million is designated to build missing segments of the sidewalk and bike networks and $115 million overall is reserved for bike-ped projects across the city.

With your help, w​e kept biking and walking projects prioritized during the bond project selection process to deliver bike-ped bridges, improved crossings, and more than doubling the pace of current efforts to complete Denver’s bike and sidewalk networks.

Funding a Bikeable, Walkable Denver

Bicycle Colorado formed and leads the Denver Streets Partnership (DSP), a group of nonprofit organizations advocating to fund, build and maintain a complete, active transportation system. Denver’s infrastructure to walk and bike safely has been neglected for years. At current funding levels it would take more than 160 years to build complete sidewalk and bike lane networks.

The Problem
  • Denver’s infrastructure to walk and bike safely has been underfunded for years. At current funding levels it would take more than 160 years to build complete sidewalk and bike lane networks.
  • Many people have no choice but to drive. They do not have a safe walking or biking route or access to transit to and from their work, school, park, or local store.
  • More and more people are moving to Denver every day and the number of people who drive alone is climbing. Transportation issues are the #1 concern for Denver residents.
The Solution

Invest $40 million a year into building and maintaining our walking and biking networks. This will bring Denver on par with other major U.S. cities and create the options people want to get around safely.

The Benefits
  • Access to amenities, services and opportunities
  • Better individual and community health
  • Stronger local and household economies
  • Improved air quality
  • Sustainable lifestyle options

Featured Projects

Denver Vision Zero

Mayor Michael Hancock announced Denver’s commitment to Vision Zero in February 2016 with the intent to eliminate transportation-related injuries and deaths. Bicycle Colorado is part of the Denver Vision Zero Coalition steering committee. We believe that updating and improving street design to safely accommodate active transportation is one of the most important ways Denver can reach its Vision Zero goal.

14th Street Bikeway

Denver’s newest protected bike lane opened in July. It runs from Market to Colfax at Civic Center Park  alongside Denver landmarks like Hotel Teatro, the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, the Colorado Convention Center, and the Hyatt Downtown. The parking-protected lane features curb-protection, painted crosswalks and turn boxes.

+ Get complete details in this Streetsblog article

Additional Projects & Local Resources

Denver Moves Bikes Plan

“Denver Moves” defines the vision for non-motorized transportation and recreation in Denver, identifying the next phase of priorities for making multi-use connections in the city. Denver Moves focuses on integrating the existing off-street and on-street networks to create corridors that link neighborhoods, parks, employment centers, business districts, transit hubs and other destinations.

The plan was put together in 2011. Bicycle Colorado and the Denver Streets Partnership are advocating for $40 million of annual funding to complete the plan in 20 years. At current funding levels, it would take more than 50 years to build out.

Read the plan
Denver bike maps
Youth, outreach, volunteer and free bike programs
  1. Bikes Together – bike camps, bike rodeos, earn-a-bike programs, mechanic classes and more
  2. Bikes for Life – a program of Children’s Hospital Colorado created to help kids develop healthy lifestyle habits through bicycling
  3. Colorado High School Cycling League – mountain bike racing programs offered at several area high schools
  4. Front Rangers Cycling Club – hosts youth rides in collaboration with the Denver Police Department, District 1 and the Sun Valley Youth Center
  5. Groundwork Denver Green Team – youth volunteer program focused on urban Denver; includes mountain bike trail building
  6. Impact 360 – a program serving disadvantaged youth; includes a health and wellness component incorporating bicycling
  7. Lucky Bikes Recyclery – a community-based retail bike shop selling used and new bicycles, parts, apparel and service to support Trips for Kids Denver Metro programming
  8. Pedal Adventure Camp – multi-day riding camps that combine bicycling with discovering the city of Denver
  9. Project Recycle – provides bicycles to kids (and adults) in need to offer a healthier lifestyle
  10. Recycle Bicycles – distributes donated bicycles, at no cost, to inner city shelters, housing projects and schools
  11. Trips for Kids Denver Metro – empowers at-risk and disadvantaged youth, using the bicycle as a tool to foster positive life skills, healthy youth development, and a sense of fun and adventure.
  12. Wish for Wheels – gives the gift of a brand new bicycle and helmet to low-income children (grades k-2)
Community bike shops

Community bike shops are a little different than your average retail store. They are nonprofits accepting donations of bikes, gear and cash in support of the neighborhoods around them. At community bike shops, you can find very inexpensive bicycles, parts and accessories for sale. You can also find programs that teach basic bike mechanic skills; opportunities for volunteers to earn a free bicycle to help them get around; plus community events and camps that teach kids how to ride.

  1. Bikes Together (Park Hill and Mariposa)
  2. Lucky Bikes Recyclery
Bicycle Colorado
@BicycleColo

The number of dockless bike share systems is rising by the day. That’s why we’re hosting the Future of Bike Share,… https://t.co/TTOIIn2yXx

  • Have you tried any of the new #dockless bike shares around town? Learn about the shifting bike share landscape at Moving People Forward 2018! Click the link in our bio to learn more and register today. •••
#Repost @bike_here
・・・
A snowy morning commute in Denver today! The snow is now melted and we hope you’ll get some pedaling time in today.
  • Colorado weather means being ready to ride in any condition! Did you bike today? Share your ride by tagging us: @bicyclecolo #bicyclecolorado
  • Meet Scott Kubly, our 2018 Moving People Forward keynote speaker!

The architect of the award-winning Move Seattle plan, Kubly helped transform Seattle into an urban model of multimodal transportation, in which 95 percent of the nearly 45,000 jobs created in the past few years have been filled by people who walk, bike or take public transit to work. Kubly has helped countless city leaders and urban planners proactively address challenges in the ever-changing urban transportation landscape.
Kubly will share his vision for how Coloradans can address current transportation demands while planning for the future. His insight will be invaluable for anyone wondering how Colorado infrastructure can keep up with the increasing demands of an growing population.
Learn more, and register today, by clicking the link in our bio.